Truly Nolen of America Announces West Palm Beach Branch Manager Promotion

mousecarTruly Nolen of America, Inc., the largest family-owned pest control company in the United States, is pleased to announce the promotion of Arthur Pegler to branch manager of the company’s West Palm Beach branch.

Having begun the manager-in-training program in July, Arthur “Art” Pegler has more than 29 years of experience in the pest control industry, adding great educational value and experience to the branch located in Greenacres. Pegler began his career as a fumigator working his way up to service manager and collecting the knowledge he has today to rid the Palm Beach area of pests.

Effective immediately, Pegler will monitor and evaluate administrative staff and technicians, as well as handle day-to-day operations for his branch.

“Art’s excellent work ethic and experience is a perfect fit for our West Palm Beach branch,” said Mervin Robinson, district manager for the South Florida area. “We’re looking forward to him becoming an outstanding leader in helping us further Truly Nolen’s presence in this market.”

The company, which is celebrating its 75th anniversary this year, is represented in 58 countries with a total of 272 branches including commercial, franchise and corporate branches.

To reach the West Palm Beach branch, please visit or call 561-641-8161.

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Truly Nolen Joins the Fountain Hills Community

Company announces new branch in this tight-knit suburb outside Scottsdale

Truly Nolen Joins the Fountain Hills CommunityWHAT: Fountain Hills residents, rejoice! Truly Nolen, the largest family-owned pest control company in America, is moving in. With the support of the Fountain Hills Chamber of Commerce, the new branch will be celebrating their opening with a ribbon cutting on Tuesday, October 15 at 5 p.m. where guests can enjoy networking with food and prize giveaways.

“We’re so excited to expand our presence in the Fountain Hills community,” said Branch Manager Shawnacee Neziol. “Our Truly customer-centric service will bring consistency and knowledge to the close-knit community of Fountain Hills.”

In honor of the opening, Truly Nolen Sales Inspector and local resident Mike Densford is running a promotion to serve the community: every customer will receive $25 off a new annual agreement and 10% off select services such as termite and rodent control. In addition, Truly Nolen will donate $25 to the new customer’s choice of non-profit organization – the Fountain Hills Theatre, the Fountain Hills Botanical Garden, the Boys and Girls Club of Fountain Hills, or the Fountain Hills Library.

Truly Nolen has more than 80 corporate branch offices in Arizona, California, Florida, Nevada, New Mexico, Texas and Utah and grosses over $100 million in revenue in the US. The company also has independently owned and operated franchises in an ever-growing number of states and territories including Kentucky, Georgia, New Jersey, Canada, and Puerto Rico, totaling 58 countries.

WHO: Branch Manager Shawnacee Neziol + the Truly Nolen Fountain Hills Team

WHEN:Tuesday, October 15 at 5 p.m.

WHERE:11881 North Saguaro Boulevard, Suite 2
Fountain Hills, AZ 85268

MEDIA CONTACT: Michelle Hawthorn, TilsonPR
561-910-4301
mhawthorn@tilsonpr.com

Wendy Shauben, Tilson PR
561-310-0043
wschauben@tilsonpr.com

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Watch Your Step for Scorpions Frightening Pest may be Southwest’s Public Enemy No. 1

Arizona_Bark_ScorpionOne of the most infamous of pests, the scorpion is one of the most difficult to eliminate. They spend most of their time tucked away in cracks or crevices and are even found in children’s sand boxes. Although scorpions are not aggressive hunters, their sting can be quite painful – and in the case of one species found in the U.S., it can sometimes be fatal. The most venomous scorpion in North America, Centriroides exilicauda, is commonly referred to as the Arizona bark scorpion. As one of the smaller species of scorpion, an adult male can grow up to eight centimeters long, yellow to yellow-brown in color, with a long slender tail. It is found throughout the desert Southwest including Arizona (where it was first discovered in Tempe in 1927), western New Mexico, northern Mexico, and the west bank of the Colorado River in California.

Altogether, more than 30 species of scorpions are found in the southern and western United States, including scorpions common to New Mexicans such as the striped scorpion and the Desert Hairy scorpion. While these non-threatening species can inflict a painful sting, serums are available to relieve the more severe symptoms.
Because scorpions normally move about on the tips of their eight legs, with their bodies seldom touching the surface, they are among the most difficult of pests to control,. As a result, many pesticides are not as effective, since most common pesticides depend on physical contact with the animal’s body. One effective way to eliminate them is to remove their food supply, but it can take time for that approach to work.

Scorpions feed on insects, so effective scorpion control is dependent on a more complete pest control program. Since they can survive for weeks without food, and will resort to cannibalism when there is no other source, one of the most effective ways to eliminate scorpions is to physically remove them, one by one, usually at night when they are active. Fortunately, their bodies glow under a black light, so they are relatively easy to spot in the dark.

By the time you see scorpions in the open, you probably already have a serious infestation. For that reason, homeowners should be alert to more subtle signs of scorpions, which can include the sudden, unexplained disappearance of other insects, or finding insect body parts piled neatly in remote corners.
Most of all, be advised that scorpions are sedentary and prefer the most humid available locations. Being aware of areas conducive to a scorpion infestation is also important in preventing them from getting comfortable. Such areas include:

  • Under Garbage cans

  • Organic matter in and around gardens and plant pots

  • Under and around rock beds

  • Untrimmed palm trees, since the fronds collect moisture and other insects

  • Old lumber or bricks

  • Decaying debris such as leaves or bark

  • Stored boxes

  • Water meter / irrigation boxes

  • Wall voids and conduits

  • Insect infested areas such as attics

About Scott Svenheim and Truly Nolen

Scott Svenheim, an expert for Truly Nolen of America and Associate Certified Entomologist, has 27 years of experience in the pest control industry. Scott brings an informative as well as unique and entertaining perspective to consumers’ pest problems in the 21st century. Founded in 1938, Tucson, Arizona-based Truly Nolen of America is the largest family owned pest control company in the United States. Truly Nolen has over 80 branch offices in Arizona, California, Florida, Nevada, New Mexico, Texas and Utah. The company also has independently owned and operated franchises in an ever-growing number of territories including Kentucky, Georgia, New Jersey, Canada, Puerto Rico and 55 countries. For more information, please visit www.trulynolen.com.

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Truly Nolen of Las Cruces ‘Cuts the Cheese’

Company Announces Expanding Services to Las Cruces

mousecarWHAT: Las Cruces residents now have nothing to fear when it comes to pests. Truly Nolen, the largest family-owned pest control company in America, will be ‘cutting the cheese’ as they welcome the addition of Las Cruces to their service area with a ribbon cutting Thursday, September 12.

“The entire team is looking forward to servicing the area with Truly advanced techniques and care,” said Omar Martinez, Truly Nolen branch manager. “We can’t wait to show the people of Las Cruces the quality of pest control Truly Nolen has to offer and let them know we’re here for them.”

At the company’s ribbon cutting, attendees can enjoy a mix and mingle, food and music, as well as giveaways from gift cards to a flat screen TV.

The company, which is celebrating 75 years of business this year, has more than 14 employees throughout the state of New Mexico and more than 1,000 employees nationwide. Areas now being serviced also include Anthony, Mesquite and Vado.

WHO: Omar Martinez + Las Cruces Truly Nolen Team

WHEN:Thursday, September 12 at 5:00 p.m.

WHERE:Las Cruces Home Builders Hall
2825 N. Main Street
Las Cruces, N.M. 88001

MEDIA CONTACT: To schedule an interview with Scott, please contact Michelle Hawthorn, TilsonPR.
561-910-4301
mhawthorn@tilsonpr.com

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St. Petersburg Roof Collapse Caused by Termites

Subterranean termites take a big bite out of local homes

st-petersburge-termiteWHAT: The above photo taken last week depicts exactly what happens when a colony of subterranean termites makes a home out of your house. As roofs collapse, subterranean termites are creating havoc in other homes unbeknownst to their owners.

Why have subterranean termites arrived months ahead of schedule? And what can homeowners do to prepare and prevent?

Jeffery McChesney of Truly Nolen saw a 30 percent increase of these silent destroyers last winter and predicts this year to be even worse. The increase in rain has allowed soil to get saturated, creating the perfect moist conditions for termites to thrive.

Available for interviews upon request, Jeffery has these tips (and more):

  • Eliminate or reduce moisture in and around your home.
  • Maintain at least an 18-inch gap between your home and soil.
  • Trim hedges and other vegetation to prevent ventilation blockages.

WHERE: St. Petersburg area.

WHO: Scott Brody

WHEN: Subterranean termites swarming now, months earlier than normal.

WHY: Subterranean termites swarming now, months earlier than normal.

  • Termite damage is rarely covered by home insurance.
  • Subterranean termites are the most destructive species of termite.
  • An estimated $5 billion in termite-related property damage occurs every year in America.

CONTACT: To schedule an interview with Jeffrey, please contact Michelle Hawthorn, TilsonPR at 561-910-4301
mhawthorn@tilsonpr.com

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Truly Good Citizens Walk Against Heart Disease

Truly Nolen of Orlando Raises More Than $20,000 for American Heart Association

mousecarWHAT: At this year’s Orlando Heart Walk, participants will kick off their walk at the start line with a wave from the mouselimo and a brigade of mousecars. And once you’ve crossed the finish line, the Truly booth will be conducting giveaways, such as a one-year Four Season Pest Control service, and bug demos for the kids at heart.

Truly Nolen of Orlando has committed to giving back to the community in which they live and work. Participating for the third year in a row, the Truly Good Citizens team has raised more than $20,000 in donations for this year’s American Heart Association event and dedicated more than 300 hours of service throughout 2013.

The same ruthless exterminators that rid your home of pests are fighting back against cardiovascular diseases and stroke with a sponsorship of this year’s Orlando Heart Walk.

WHO: Scott Brody

WHEN: Saturday, September 7 at 7:00 a.m.

MEDIA CONTACT: To schedule an interview with Scott, please contact Michelle Hawthorn, TilsonPR.
561-910-4301
mhawthorn@tilsonpr.com

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Mike Tanner promoted to District Manager

Truly Nolen of America has promoted Mike Tanner to district manager overseeing commercial services for Tucson, Phoenix and San Diego.

Tanner initially worked for Truly Nolen from 1996 to 1998 as a financial analyst in the Corporate Office located in Tucson. Tanner rejoined Truly Nolen in 2011 as the Western Region Sales Manager and helped to revamp the sales training program.

Inside Tucson Business

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One House Mouse Can Quickly Become Bigger Problem, Pose Risk to Health and Property

Some think that they’re cute, but they scare the wits out of others. However you feel about mice, one thing is clear: If you see one or evidence of one in your home, it’s better to act quickly to get rid of them. Otherwise, the little fury critters can wreak havoc in your home and pose a health risk to you and your family.

As the most common mammal in the country, we all will most likely encounter mice at some point. The colder fall and winter months are the time when mice and other rodents look to come inside warm structures searching for food and protection against the freezing temperatures. Each year, an estimated 21 million invade homes across the country, according the National Pest Management Association.

They’re hungry little critters, too. Mice eat between 15 to 20 times a day, so they prefer to be near food. They can also jump about a foot into the air, giving them the ability to hop up onto counters or pantries. Their tiny bodies can fit through an opening the size of a dime, making any crack or small opening to the outside an entry point into your home.

While mice don’t live a long time, about five months in the wild, they make up for that by having a lot of baby mice fast. A female mouse can give birth starting at two months old and can have about a dozen babies every three weeks. If you spotted one mouse in the house, there are probably others lurking nearby, and it can quickly become a bigger infestation if it’s not properly addressed.

Mice also like to gnaw on electrical wiring, causing damage that can lead to a greater risk of an electrical fire. Beyond that, mice can carry as many as 200 disease-causing organisms, such as the Hantavirus and Salmonella.

Simple preventative measure can help keep mice and other rodents outside in the cold. Truly Nolen recommends homeowners take the following steps to protect their property and their family’s health:

  • Install door sweeps on exterior doors and repair damaged screens.
  • Screen vents and openings to chimneys.
  • Seal cracks and holes on the outside of the home, including areas where utilities and pipes enter the home, using caulk, steel wool or a combination of both.
  • Keep a close eye on the garage. As it is hard to seal up adequately, mice can move in here easily, readily accessing the rest of the house with ease.
  • Store food in airtight containers and dispose of garbage regularly.
  • Keep attics, basements and crawl spaces well ventilated and dry.
  • Replace loose mortar and weather stripping around the basement foundation and windows.
  • Eliminate all moisture sites, including leaking pipes and clogged drains that provide the perfect breeding site for pests.
  • Store firewood at least 20 feet away from the house and keep shrubbery trimmed and cut back from the house.
  • If you suspect a pest infestation in your home, contact a licensed pest professional to inspect and treat the pest problem.
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National Pest Management Month: Four Common Pests to Watch Out For

We all know the feeling of the cringe-worthy moment when we hear little scurries across the floorboards, or see teeny droppings in our cupboards and run to call for the first available pest control service appointment.

For more than 30 years, the National Pest Management Association has celebrated the month of April as ‘National Pest Management Month’ to recognize pest management professionals for their efforts in protecting individuals’ health and property from those cringe-worthy moments. With spring season upon us, now is a good time to brush up on four common household nuisances and how to prevent or identify an infestation.

So the next time you see a creepy crawler and wonder what it is, keep in mind these four common pests:

Ants: Ranging from reddish browns to blacks and even yellow, ants are common throughout the year. No matter the climate, ants have an arduous way about them, making their homes in the tiniest of places. As the number one nuisance in the U.S., ants are capable of infesting office buildings, homes and restaurants. Ants are often attracted by sweets and proteins, so keep spills, pet food and other foods cleaned up and/or containers tightly sealed.

Termites: Termites live in colonies that can grow to large numbers. Their usual methods of infesting a home can include entering through cracks in concrete floors from underground, a space as small as 1/64th of an inch or larger. Termites can also be carried in through infested wood such as old furniture, firewood or building materials. Both Subterranean and Drywood termite colonies even have members equipped with wings, being able to fly into a home and begin a new colony. Make sure to have your home thoroughly inspected yearly by a professional to spot termites and/or damage before it’s too late.

Spiders: Varying greatly in size, spiders are often the sign of a more serious insect infestation. As carnivorous hunters, spiders feast on insects such as ants and crickets and hide in cracks and crevices under well-protected areas inside or outside the home. Being popular all year round, the best way to reduce the risk of spider invasions is to remove clutter, repair windows and screens and dust regularly.

Bed Bugs: Bed bugs are known to be travelers, packing away in your suitcase until the most opportune moment to make themselves cozy in your home. Living up to one and a half years, bed bugs produce between one and eight eggs daily. Since you can’t feel the bite of a bed bug, homeowners should be aware of inflamed bites with clusters or rows. Inspect your surroundings carefully when traveling to avoid bringing bed bugs home with you.

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More Bugs: The Unwelcome Impact of Climate Change

What does the ever-changing weather patterns have to do with pest control? Quite a bit, actually. As northern parts of the country are experiencing extremely low temperatures, and other areas are oddly warmer than usual, the change in our typical seasonal patterns raises a red flag for changes in pest activity.

Irregular changes in the weather, such as spikes in cold temperatures, have the potential to significantly diminish a pest predator’s population, affecting the balance of the ecosystem and allowing pests to thrive and flourish as they take advantage and adapt without anyone to threaten their livelihood. As the populations of predators decrease, pests are able to recuperate from the weather change significantly quicker.

The impact of climate change on insects and humans is far reaching – forest and food crops could be affected and diseases spread by insects could have a wider range. Nature has a delicate balance and it doesn’t take much – a slight temperature variation, or even a movement in the course of a river – to cause changes that move throughout an ecosystem.

Since mosquitoes are the most common carriers of malaria and yellow fever, dramatic increases in these diseases would be likely. Moreover, both the National Centers for Disease Control and the World Health Organization report that current treatments for malaria and yellow fever are becoming less effective, leading to the potential for plague-like levels of these diseases, unlike anything seen since the U.S. Civil War.

Pests like the cockroach, bed bug, scorpion and mosquito are among the most adaptable and successful life forms on earth. For example, cockroaches are among the oldest living creatures. They survived the Ice Age, and are believed to have persisted for more than 350 million years. With that record of success, we can be sure they will adapt and thrive in changing climate patterns.

Bed bugs have been around since the 11th century and have learned to live and adapt as humans do while acclimating and adjusting to the warmer and milder climates, creating a new page in their pest evolution. In the southern part of the country, these nomadic pests have caused infestations to rise exponentially, threatening vacationers’ favorite sunny spots and bringing home with them unwanted house guests.

We know that there is a strong, direct relationship between the level of insect populations and fluctuating temperatures. As variations in the seasons become more evident, predictions for pest activity in 2013 reflect similarly to what we’ve seen in 2012. And since 2012 was one of the hottest years on record, what we can expect in 2013 is a continuation of abnormal pest activity.

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